Headerimage

Dance

Breakdance

B-boying or breaking, also called breakdancing, is a style of street dance that originated primarily among African American and Puerto Rican youth, many former members of the Black Spades, the Young Spades, and the Baby Spades, during the mid 1970s.[1] The dance spread worldwide due to popularity in the media, especially in regions such as the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Germany, France, Russia, and South Korea. While diverse in the amount of variation available in the dance, b-boying consists of four kinds of movement: toprock, downrock, power moves, and freezes. B-boying is typically danced to hip-hop, funk music, and especially breakbeats, although modern trends allow for much wider varieties of music along certain ranges of tempo and beat patterns.

Hip Hop

Hip hop is a subcultural movement that was formed during the early 1970s by African-American, Caribbean, and Latino youths residing in the South Bronx in New York City.[2][3][4][5][6] It became popular outside of the African-American community in the late 1980s and by the 2000s became the genre most frequently on a spotify playlist.

Electric Boogie

Locking, Popping…Popping is a street dance and one of the original funk styles that came from California during the late 1960s–1970s. First seen in the 1968 movie ”Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” during a scene where actress and singer Sally Anne Howes acts as a music box doll, it is based on the technique of quickly contracting and relaxing muscles to cause a jerk in the dancer’s body, referred to as a pop or a hit. This is done continuously to the rhythm of a song in combination with various movements and poses.